John Pitre

John Pitre

Born in 1942 and educated in the fine arts at the prestigious Art Students League in New York City, John Pitre evolved to become a master of fantasy and surrealism. Pitre has been a significant influence in the art world for over thirty years, and carries the distinction of being one of the most widely published artists in modern history.

As a storyteller, Pitre uses his paintbrush to comment on the most profound questions concerning man, and to create a reflection of our times and the world in which we live. He creates entire imaginary worlds completely from his mind, using artistic expression as a vehicle for powerful social commentary. Well before they became the significant social issues of our times, Pitre's surrealistic renditions of the threat of overpopulation, the ominous shadow of nuclear war, and the ecological deterioration of our planet became widely popular as poster images, selling in the millions. One image alone, "Restrictions", sold an estimated seven million copies. Through his art Pitre continues to bring to our attention important aspects of our human condition, and as a result of his visionary talents, his social commentary paintings are now considered twentieth-century classics.

Look beyond the surface, and into the depths of paintings by John Pitre, and you will look into the mind and soul of one of mankind's great thinkers. Through his social commentary art and visionary paintings he shares his vision of our purpose in the universe, and reminds us of the responsibilities we have as moral beings and as stewards of our planet. He tells about life as a human citizen here on Earth, warning about its difficulties and pitfalls, but also portrays the beauty and magic that each one of us possesses within. He encourages us to follow dreams, and to hold dear the relationships we have with all other men.

Pitre's work is transcendental in nature and many people derive their own profound yet private meaning from his paintings. When describing Pitre's work, most people speak not of its appearance, amazing as it is, but rather of their own personal moment of epiphany inspired by the paintings of this master.